Squaddie banter and a cuppa – support for Veterans in Falkirk

Just turned two, Falkirk Veterans is already making a big difference for veterans in Forth Valley, many of them older. In her guest blog Falkirk Veterans Chair Maggie Brown tells us more about this important service.


Falkirk Veterans aims to enable veterans, and often also currently service personnel, in getting together to ‘return to the tribe’ and become stronger, together. We have a Drop-In (the only one in Forth Valley) for anyone who feels isolated, needs some confidential help or just some squaddie banter and giggles with a cuppa and light bites. We now regularly FalkirkVetslogohave around 25 to 30 veterans, and a few family members, who attend every week. We also have a Breakfast Club, where former and serving military can enjoy an amazing breakfast and share memories and laughs. Businesses locally pitch in, with generously weekly donations from Asda, Greggs, Malcolm Allan, Thomas Johnson, Marshalls Bakers and Patricks of Camelon. We are also registered as referees for our local food bank and often make up food parcels for our more vulnerable veterans.

We are developing a Garden Club in the walled garden in Callander Park, which very soon will provide a safe, quiet space for relaxation and pottering around planting flowers or vegetables. This is particularly relevant for veterans who have suffered trauma related injuries. We grow and pick vegetables and give out food bags to our more vulnerable veterans.

There’s a social club with occasional free days out for families and a few other events during the year. In August, 19 veterans and their carers went to the Edinburgh Tattoo, thanks to a grant from the Not Forgotten Association. One said it was “the first time he had been out of his house and had gone to an event in 15 years.” A recent Hawaiian night was a great success with more bonding, fun and a break away from their normal lives.

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Welfare and signposting is the more serious part. Setting up support agencies and services, and expecting veterans to go to them, has long been the normal practice. But when individuals have been trained and conditioned to persevere and succeed under all circumstances and despite all adversities, as they are in the Armed Forces, it makes it very difficult for many veterans to accept, or even admit that they need help in the first place! This is why drop-ins like ours are so important. We build up the confidence and self-esteem of the individual to accept the help that is on offer to them. We have helped several veterans with welfare advice, counselling, housing and furniture: we have part of a storage container held at the Royal British Legion Grangemouth where we store furniture and furnishings donated from the public

Want to know more about what we do, or think you could support us? Pop over to our Drop-In, sample a cuppa and a hot filled roll and see for yourself what we do and what we offer.

  • The Drop-In is on Thursdays 11am-2pm at Royal British Legion, Grangemouth.
  • The Breakfast Club is second Sunday and last Saturday of every month, 10am in the Graeme Hotel, Falkirk

Falkirk Veterans is one of a growing number of organisations offering a ‘veterans’ warm welcome’ listed by Age Scotland’s Community Connecting service. To find out what is available in your area, call the Age Scotland Helpline for free on 0800 12 44 222 (Monday to Friday 9am – 5pm).

 

 

What keeps you sharp?

Isn’t the expression ‘having a senior moment’ awful? Yet people often think of changes in their mental skills with age in terms of decline. While some people do experience these changes, others do not. So how do our thinking skills change as we age? And do our lifestyles affect those changes?

Those are just two of the questions that will be tackled in “What Keeps You Sharp?” at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe this August. The show, led by Dr Alan Gow from Heriot-Watt University, returns as part of the Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas. It will be a chance to explore a range of issues around changes in thinking skills, from when those changes might be expected (if at all), how those changes might be influenced by genes or lifestyles, and what lifestyle factors might be good or bad for brain health.

As we grow older, we are more likely to experience general declines in our thinking and memory skills (these are referred to as our mental or cognitive abilities). Some individuals experience noticeable changes in their thinking and memory skills across their 60s and beyond, while others maintain these abilities into old age. This variation suggests that a number of factors influence the likelihood of mental decline.

Alan and his team in The Ageing Lab at Heriot-Watt are exploring some of those factors, and in the show you’ll hear about some of their own and others works focussing on the kinds of things we might do more of, or less of, to protect our brains as we age.

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The big questions being explored in the “What Keeps You Sharp?” show were part of a UK-wide survey that was completed earlier last year. The audience will therefore have a chance to share their own thoughts about thinking skills, compare those to the 3000+ people across the UK who took part in the survey, and hear how that all links back to what the most recent research suggests. But don’t worry, it’s not a traditional lecture – one of the rules within the Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas programme is that you can’t use slides, and the shows are also compered by comedian Susan Morrison to keep everything on track.

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“What Keeps You Sharp?” is on twice during the Fringe, at the New Town Theatre on George Street on 7 August (8.10pm) and 16 August (1.30pm). You can watch a short trailer here, or read more about the show and buy tickets here.

And if you can’t make it along, you can still find out more. Last year’s show was recorded for part of BBC Radio Scotland’s Brainwaves series. You can listen to that programme here…though best not to listen if you’re coming along as it might spoil some of the questions you’ll be thinking about!


Book your tickets today!

“What Keeps You Sharp?” is part of Cabaret of Dangerous Ideas 2018: 
Debate, discussion and discourse at the Edinburgh Fringe

Catch the show at the New Town Theatre on George Street, Edinburgh on 7 August (8.10pm) and 16 August (1.30pm).

 

The Veterans’ Guide to Later Life in Scotland – out now

As we near UK Armed Forces Day (30 June) Age Scotland has launched a free advice guide for older veterans.

The Veterans’ Guide to Later Life in Scotland offers veterans a route map to embracing opportunities and overcoming challenges that later life can bring.  It’s available to download, and postal copies can be requested from the Age Scotland Helpline 0800 12 44 222 or by emailing publications@agescotland.org.uk.  Here’s a flavour of what it offers older veterans, their families and professionals working with and for them.

Being treated fairly

Did you know that each council and health board in Scotland has signed a promise to every veteran?  Known as the Armed Forces Covenant this says you “should face no disadvantage compared to other citizens” and that “special consideration is appropriate in some cases, especially for those who have given most such as the injured and bereaved.”

Keeping well

Did you know that veterans are entitled to priority NHS treatment for health problems caused or made worse by military service? That means they should be seen more quickly than someone on the same waiting list who has the same level of clinical need.  There are NHS Veterans Champions you can speak to if you feel this hasn’t happened.

Care

When someone needs to move to a care home their social work department can carry out a financial assessment to see how much financial help they qualify for.  Did you know that if they are a veteran receiving War Pensions and Armed Forces Compensation Scheme payments, these payments won’t be counted as income in the financial assessment?  This means they may be eligible for more funding.

Housing

Did you know that specialist housing for veterans is provided by a number of charitable organisations in Scotland – from single rooms to adapted family homes?  The guide includes a list of providers you can apply for housing with.

Money matters

The guide introduces the main benefits relevant to older veterans.  Benefits rules are complex and the guide will not give you all the answers.  It will however help you to ask the right questions, which you can then put to the Age Scotland Helpline 0800 12 44 222.  In the first half of 2018, the helpline identified around £25,000 of unclaimed benefits for our veteran callers and their dependents.

Out and about

Did you know that veterans and their families can get discounts for many goods and services through the Defence Discount Service, the official MOD discount service for the UK’s armed forces and veterans?

Download the guide here or get a copy posted out for free by calling the Age Scotland Helpline 0800 12 44 222 or by emailing publications@agescotland.org.uk.

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Top tips for enjoying a heatwave safely

Scotland isn’t known for its hot summer months so when we do get some sunshine, we all want to make the most of it. It’s important to remember though that when the temperature goes up it can present health risks – especially for older people.


As we age, our body becomes less efficient at regulating our temperature, and this can be exacerbated by some types of medication. Some individuals are at greater risk, for example people living with dementia, heart problems (because the heart must work harder to pump extra blood to help cool your body down) or reduced mobility (which could make some tasks such as opening and closing windows or getting a drink of water more difficult).

By taking a few sensible precautions ourselves, and checking in with the older people you know, we can make sure everyone is able to make the best of the warmer weather.

Top tips for staying cool in a heatwave

  1. Stay cool inside during the hottest time of the day from late morning to mid-afternoon. If you do go out use sunscreen of factor 15 or above, wear a hat and stay in the shade if you can. Keep your house cool by keeping curtains and blinds closed in rooms that catch the sun.
  2. Limit strenuous activities like housework and gardening – most chores will keep until its cooler.
  3. Drink lots of fluid, whether you are at home or out and about. Limit caffeine and avoid alcohol as they increase the risk of dehydration.
  4. Watch what you eat:
  • Try to have more cold foods such as salads and fruits as they contain a lot of water
  • Keep chilled food cold, bacteria grow quickly in warm weather
  • Keep hot food hot, particularly make sure barbequed food is cooked right through
  1. Dress for the sun, light-coloured, loose cotton clothing can help you stay cool in the heat. Let your feet breathe too, wear comfortable sandals which support your feet
  2. Cool off with cold water, a cool bath, shower or splash of water on your face can help you cool down. .
  3. Check for weather forecasts and temperature warnings on TV, radio and online at www.metoffice.gov.uk  

Helping each other in the heat

We would also encourage everyone to check in on older neighbours, friends and family to check that they are doing ok and ask if they need anything. Doing a quick run to the shops to pick up some sunscreen or helping to open/close a window to let some fresh air in can make the world of difference to someone’s comfort and wellbeing.


For more tips download our sisters charity Age UK’s publication on ‘Keeping Cool in a heatwave‘ or call the Age Scotland helpling for free on 0800 12 44 222. 

Free call blocking device to protect older people against scammers

This month (June) is Scams Awareness Month – a yearly campaign led by Citizen’s Advice Bureau to educate people about the current scams including tips on how to spot fraud. CAB’s latest study shows that half of all Scots who are targeted by scams are over the age of 65 and of those affected, 61% were scammed via their landline.

Laura Jamieson from Trading Standards Scotland highlights new free call blocking device available to Scots aged 50 years and older that can help them limit nuisance calls.

Trading Standards Scotland (TSS) obtained funding from the Scottish Government for the provision of call blocking devices, which are allocated to older and vulnerable people in Scotland.

Nuisance calls, and more specifically scam calls, can greatly increase the risk of financial harm. Scam calls, offering lucrative returns on investments including fine wine and precious jewels, are designed to dupe consumers into parting with large sums of cash. Call blocking technology can prevent these getting through in the first place.

In addition, doorstep criminals are beginning to move into cold calling potential victims prior to turning up on their doorstep. Call blocking technology can help prevent the initial call getting through in the first place, preventing a later visit at the door where in some cases, victims have lost thousands of pounds.  This all helps to reduce fear of crime and the fear that someone is watching their home, which can be compounded if a cold call is indeed followed up with a visit.

With all of the above in mind, the technology can also reduce the need for affected individuals to move into residential care. Pressure to do so can stem from family members simply being too worried that the individual is no longer able to look after themselves, either as a result of being scammed or as they have experienced too many accidents.

The findings from the TSS call blocking project, which concluded in August 2015 demonstrated that on average older and vulnerable people in Scotland receive 60 nuisance and scam calls per month. This is around 58% of all the calls they receive. During the course of the study, 95% of the nuisance calls were blocked using the device, which is easy to install.

The call blocking device undeniably has a benefit to the well-being of vulnerable residents and their carers. People involved in the study, their families and their professional carers reported the benefits of having the device included:

  • people are able to live independently for longer;
  • the risk of financial harm was significantly reduced;
  • the risk of trips, falls and distraction accidents were reduced;
  • anxiety and stress was minimised for the study participants as well as their families and carers;
  • those living alone felt safer and more in control.

If you or someone you know would benefit from having a call blocker installed, contact Laura Jamieson on laura@cosla.gov.uk

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Being aware of Scams

June 2018 is Scams Awareness Month – an annual opportunity to raise awareness of and tackle these cruel crimes. We hear from Emily Liddle, Campaigns Officer at Citizens Advice Scotland about what to look out for.


Spam emails, cold callers and suspicious activity alerts from your bank; unfortunately, scams and fraud seem to have become a part of our daily lives.

We want to reduce the risk and impact of scams by raising awareness and encouraging people to take action – recognising, reporting and talking about the issues.

Although anyone can be victim to a scam, there are certain groups in society that are more frequently targeted by scammers. Whether this is a young person being targeted via a social media pop-up tying them into a subscription trap or an older person who receives an unexpected visit on their doorstep from a trusted provider without credentials.

Scams aren’t just a minor inconvenience to people. Aside from financial loss, they can cause distress, misery and even if a scam has been avoided, it can lead to widespread loss of confidence.

Reporting a Crime

Underreporting and stigma continue to be barriers in scams and fraud. There are so many types of scams, with new scam tactics consistently emerging and tricking consumers; as well as scams that we don’t know about which makes it very difficult to help, prevent and support those who have fallen victim.

Whilst scammers are becoming increasingly more sophisticated, groups of people continue to believe they would never fall victim, feeling they could easily spot a scam, or know how to act. It is this sense of confidence that scammers target and makes people vulnerable.

 

What should you look out for?

  • Beware of offers that use persuasive language to sell you a ‘once in a lifetime’ deal.
  • Be cautious providing bank details and personal information over the phone, especially if the caller has called to speak to you from an unknown number.
  • Always ask cold callers on your doorstep to provide credentials, don’t be afraid to check ID thoroughly. Never be afraid to say ‘no thank you’ and close the door.
  • Be wary of emails asking you to provide personal information or to login to an online site.
  • Look out for deals you click online that take you to separate website, is this site secure? Look for a small padlock symbol next to the address bar – this indicates the site is secure.

What should you do if you have been a scams target?

If you think you have been a victim of a scam or suspected scam, don’t be embarrassed. A scam could happen to anyone.

  • Get advice: from your local Citizens Advice Bureau or call Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06 who can pass details on to Trading Standards.
  • Report: always report scams or suspected scams to Police Scotland on 101
  • Tell: friends, neighbours and relatives of any scams you become aware of
  • Go online: for advice on spotting, reporting and protecting yourself against scams: visit citizensadvice.org.uk/scotland/sam2018/

• • 75 is the average age of reported scams victims• Those over-70 have the highest reported detriment from a number of different types of scams • A third of all victims (1)

Scams Awareness Month is a campaign run by Citizens Advice Scotland in partnership with a number of partner consumer organisations such as Trading Standards Scotland, Citizens Advice, Advertising Standards Agency and Government.

Being Dementia Aware: how you can help

In Scotland, around 93,000 people are living with the condition with that number set to double by 2050.   

Age Scotland’s Early Stage Dementia project is funded by the Life Changes Trust to raise awareness of dementia.  We have done this through making the charity more dementia aware and delivering our workshops to our member groups and other organisations across the country.  We have also published a suite of publications which you can access via our website here.

This Dementia Awareness Week, we want to highlight what we do day in and day out to help spread the awareness message.

This week will mark the start of our new project focussing on making communities age and dementia friendly.  As part of this we are launching an online survey to hear directly from you on your own thoughts which you can find here.

Last week, our Training Officer, Julie Turner, travelled to Orkney to launch our ‘Train the Trainer’ initiative before travelling back to Edinburgh to start our new TASTER workshops with our partners in the Age Scotland Veteran’s Project.  For more information on our TASTER sessions click here.

To celebrate Dementia Awareness Week, we also want to hear from you.

We want to know what Being Dementia Aware means to you.  Whether you are someone living with dementia, a carer, family or friend, what is being dementia aware meant for you?

To take part, you can download our campaign card from our website here, take a photo holding the card and send it to us at esdteam@agescotland.org.uk or tweet your photo or message to us using the #BeingDementiaAware hashtag.

We will also be running a ‘Being Dementia Aware’ quiz on our social media channels so make sure you are following us on Twitter and Facebook!

This year Dementia Awareness Week in Scotland runs from the 4th -10th June 2018.

The Age Scotland Early Stage Dementia Project has been running since 2016 with funding from the Life Changes Trust.  For more information on the project visit (enter website address) or email the team at esdteam@agescotand.org.uk.

 

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