Preparing for cold weather

Cold weather alerts are issued by the Met Office when the winter weather is most likely to significantly impact people’s health. The Met Office’s cold weather alerts are a way of warning about cold weather conditions in advance – so you can take extra precautions to keep safe and well.

Make sure you’re prepared with these simple steps

1. Keep an eye on the weather forecast. It’s good to know what to expect so you can plan ahead.

2. If bad weather is forecast, make sure you have everything you need. Order any repeat prescriptions in plenty of time and check you’ve got enough medication. Stock up on food to keep in the cupboards or freezer in case the weather makes it harder to leave the house.

3. Take extra care if the ground is slippery. Wear shoes with good grip and consider keeping salt and sand mixture handy to grit paths. You could always ask your neighbours for help to clear paths or driveways clear in bad weather – the vast majority of people are more than happy to help.

4. Try to avoid driving in bad weather if at all possible, and make sure you follow advice on driving conditions near you. If you do need to go out, make sure you keep blankets, some snacks, water and a shovel in the car in case you get stuck. Make sure these are easy for you to access – supplies aren’t much use if they are in the boot and you can’t get to them!

5. Cold weather can sometimes result in power cuts. Have a torch at home in case of a power cut (and don’t forget to check the batteries!) It’s also worth making sure any mobile phones, laptops or tablets are fully charged. You should report a power cut by calling 105.

For more information about keeping well in the Winter months, view our Warm and Well guide.

waw

Are you ready for winter?

Ready Scotland is a campaign by the Scottish Government to help people across Scotland to think ahead and get prepared for winter. Recent research suggested that after a couple of milder winters, many people were not taking any steps to prepare for emergencies or severe weather. The Ready Scotland site brings together simple steps you can take that can make a big difference – with the help of their trademark dog!


 

For many it has been a good few years since daily life has been disrupted by waking up to find a few feet of snow has been dumped at their front door by Mother Nature or plans have had to change thanks to the impact of strong winds and rain.

Research undertaken by the British Red Cross and the Scottish Government found that the longer the time period since an individual has had to deal with the effects of severe weather the less likely they are to take steps to prepare. As the memories of the severe weather experienced in 2010 and 2011 fade so does the intention to be ready.

Unfortunately, severe weather doesn’t stick to a rota. Past performance by the weather is not necessarily an indicator of what to expect this winter.

Scottish Government Cabinet Secretary for Infrastructure, Investment & Cities Keith Brown said:

“If there is anything recent winters have shown us it is that Scottish weather is unpredictable. The unpredictability of weather patterns means we cannot simply hope that we will miss the worst of it. While we can’t stop the weather causing disruption, we can be well prepared to cope with it.”

There are 3 elements to think about when it comes to being ready for winter.

Firstly, there is staying informed. Whether through local news, radio, social media or by signing up to the Met Office alert service, it is important that you stay in the know about imminent weather conditions.

The second element is about being prepared. Whether in the home, at work or travelling out and about there are a simple actions that will ensure you are better prepared in the event they have to deal with severe weather.

It is also important to consider whether you are prepared enough. For example, having an ice scraper and de-icer might be fine if you are only driving a mile from your home. However, for longer journeys you will want to make sure you have a blanket and a hot drink in the car in case you and your car become stranded.

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Thirdly, think about others. Are there individuals in your local community who might not be as able as you to deal with the effects of severe weather? Consider what you can do to help them be ready.

David Miller, Director of the British Red Cross in Scotland, said:

“Making sure you are prepared now for winter can make a huge difference when extreme weather hits. At the Red Cross we know that severe weather, including snow and floods, can have serious consequences. However, with a few simple steps you can make yourself and others ready for the disruption it can bring.”

For more information on how to get ready for winter visit www.readyscotland.org.

5 tips on how to be more energy efficient – August’s Hot Tips

Our free calendar “Hot Tips” aims to ensure everyone in Scotland knows about the organisations and services available to them, and provides information on how to make the most of later life.

Our topic for August is Energy Efficiency. Ciaran MacDonald, Policy Officer at Age Scotland, shares five top tips on what you can do now to be be more energy efficient and potentially save money ahead of heating your home this Winter.


This has been an exceptionally cool summer. In fact I was invited on to BBC Radio Scotland’s ‘Good Morning Scotland’ programme earlier this month to discuss what sort of knock on effect this can have, and how cooler summer months could affect a growing older population.

One of the points mentioned during this discussion was that if we spend money on heating during the summer then it could have an impact on household budgets for the rest of the year.

Yet, help is at hand. The summer months are an ideal time to think about how energy efficient our homes are. If you would like a more cost-effective and warmer home this winter, then why not follow these simple steps.

Step 1
It’s always wise to make sure your energy supplier has an accurate and up-to-date reading of your meter. Most suppliers will have dedicated lines, which you can call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to inform them of your usage.

Step 2
Call your energy supplier to see if you are on the cheapest possible tariff that reflects your usage. Although your circumstances may change throughout the year your supplier will be able to recommend the best deal for you – so just ask!

Step 3
Switch off any electrical equipment, which you don’t need left on. You could make a yearly saving of up to £3 by turning off one appliance. As some homes have up to 50 appliances on standby at any one time that’s a lot of money to be saved!

Step 4
Consider installing an energy efficiency measure. There are many simple technologies that can be added to make your home warmer, such as installing loft insulation or a more effective central heating system. Home Energy Scotland is supported by the Scottish Government and is the one stop destination for free and independent advice on what is best for your home.  Visit the Home Energy Scotland website or call 0808 808 2282 for more information.

Step 5
Don’t be scammed! Sadly there are many ruthless tradespeople out there capitalising on people’s fears of the cold. If you have any doubts or feel pressurised to agree to work then don’t! If a scheme is legitimate you will not need to sign up for it there and then. Reputable companies will fully understand this. If you have any queries or concerns then contact Home Energy Scotland (details above) or the Trading Standards Scotland Consumer Advice line on 03454 04 05 06.

Finally, if you are worried about meeting the cost of your energy supply or if you live in a home that is difficult to heat, remember help is available. For free, independent advice, why not contact Home Energy Scotland or get in touch with your local Citizens Advice Bureau or call the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.

Download your 2015 Hot Tips Calendar here and get information and advice throughout the year. Here’s what you’ve thought about Hot Tips so far:

  • “Brilliant information that I will pass onto family and friends”
  • “Thank you for the calendar – useful & attractive”
  • “Invaluable, great help – used daily, all year”

Download yours today!

Clearing the way for a better winter

A kind donation of 100 snow shovels from the Wilkinson store in Livingston was gratefully received by staff and volunteers at the Food Train West Lothian last week.

Wilkinson Livingston initially contacted Age Scotland’s fundraising department to make the generous offer, which they wanted to donate to benefit older people in the Livingston area of West Lothian. Alison Payne, one of Age Scotland’s fundraising officers, made immediate contact with local Development Officer, Laura Dunkel, to get some help with finding a member group who could make use of the shovels.

Wilkinson Livingston donate snow shovels

Martin (Age Scotland), Lorraine Thomson (Manager, Wilkinson Livingston Store), David Stewart (Wilkinson Livingston Store), Linda Lockie (Regional Manager, The Food Train) and the two volunteers from the Food Train.

Laura said: ‘I thought of the Food Train immediately when I heard about this donation from Wilkinson Livingston. The Food Train provide a really valuable service in West Lothian – they deliver groceries to older people to help them to remain independent in their own home. This service is even more valuable during the cold winter months, when older people can be anxious about the risk of falling in snowy or icy conditions.’

Linda Lockie, Regional Manager at the Food Train said: ‘We’re just about to celebrate our third birthday so the shovels are like an early birthday present to us! The service has gone from strength to strength over the last 3 years, and has proved hugely popular, we now have over 160 members across the region, and over 45 volunteers. These shovels will mean our volunteers will be able to get out and about to our members even if we do get snow this winter. We also plan to offer shovels to our members so that friends, neighbours and family members can use them to clear paths and driveways for them. Winter can be a time when older people feel more lonely and isolated and our volunteers bring not only groceries but increased social contact to the most vulnerable and frail customer.’

The Food Train always welcome any new enquiries from people interested in donating their time to assist in their local community, by becoming volunteer drivers, helpers, shoppers and Extra Service volunteers.

If you would like to volunteer or know of an older people who might benefit from the Food Train’s service, more information can be found by calling 01506 413013 or visiting www.thefoodtrain.co.uk.